Why homesteaders should steer clear of cattle.

Born 3-20-18
Born 3-20-18

I am watching a John Wayne movie, McClintock. He is on a wagon riding into town and stops to look over his cattle. The setting is roughly 1895. He is pleased because he is getting 15 cents a pound. His cattle are a horned range breed. That made him a rich man 123 years ago. I repeat…123 years ago.

You want deflation? I just sold a fatter version of the same steer for a whopping .53 cents a pound! Yet, you go to the store and want  one-hundred percent lean hamburger with no steroids, grass-fed and you pay 7.99  a pound! Hmm… why are farmers are going out of business? Why are farmers feeding the cheapest, crappiest steroid infested feed they can get?

I can say this, after this farmer gets through this time period; cows are off this farmer’s list. We have fourteen to get rid of. It will be the end of trying to raise cattle for us. We had thirty-four.

The death of cattle, illness, mud, freezing temperatures, heavy bags of feed, tractors sliding in the mud with thousand pound hay bales, barb wire fencing, coyotes and being put in the red before you even get started is not worth the sleepless nights, thorn bush scratches, kicks and bruises.

To Consumers who would rather pay cheap prices at the store I say: Import the meat, for all I care. I hope it is infested with black leg and pesticides. I’ll never run another steer through the auction again. I’ll enjoy my homegrown steak, but, I am not growing anymore cattle at these prices for the general market.

I am sticking with goats. At least I can make cheese, soap, and kifir then sell the goat for a twenty dollar profit! See if you can do that with a steer.

If insult to injury is not bad enough I just had our cantankerous long horn cow, Fruit-loops, sent in to butcher. I believe she is the culprit which ripped the ear completely off a hefty, pregnant cow; killing it. Fruit-loop’s baby we found dead; thrown into the hay ring.  She was using her horns to literally lift other cows up and even flipped one into the feed trough.  In one last good kick to the wallet she was an eight-hundred pound cow. I was told I her hang weight was three-hundred and forty-five pounds. Okay, so you got the fifty dollar kill fee and sixty-eight cents a pound to wrap. I got back one-hundred and eighty pounds of steaks, roasts, canning meat and hamburger. So where is the rest of the beef?  Turns out she was one-hundred and sixty-five pounds of bone. This is why you should never buy a dairy-cross or a longhorn, for that matter.

Let’s figure this out:

Cost of a two-hundred and twenty pound calf- $2.37 a pound is  $521.40

Cost of wintering three winters in anticipation for her calf:

24 scoops in bag of feed. 12 days of grain. Jan-April 120 days 10 bags x 8 is $80.00

Hay- one cow can eat a bale a day. Dec- April 150 days. $2 bale $300

We have $380 per year in feed and 3 winters into this cow.   Total  $1140

Wormer $45, protein bucket $40, salt blocks 6 x $6 ($36), shots $40, fly powder $20, fly bags $5, water hauled in $5, fence repairs $40 Fuel $20 that all comes to total $251 for her three year stay.

521.40+1140+251+butcher fees $286.40= $2198.80

So the cost per pound for the meat I got back from the butcher was the total of her cost divided by the amount of meat I got back.  So that would be:

$2198.80 /180 lbs=  $12.26 per pound.

Now 80 pounds was hamburger. If I was selling this cow I would probably sell the hamburger for $4 a pound and there would still be people saying that was way to high to spend for one-hundred percent grass-fed steroid-free beef. Someone suggested I should lower it to three dollars for a half or a whole. I had to bite my tongue. Now I might charge $6 a pound for steaks and roasts.

At the best that would be 100 x $6= 600

80 x $4= 320

So how much did I lose on this wretched cow. $2198.80-$920=  -1278.80

Yah, in the hole over a grand.

Also keep in mind, this cow cost me her calf which was a really pretty calf I could have gotten $200 for, a cow she ripped the ear off and its unborn calf which I might have got a $1 a pound at the sale for and she weighed 900lbs. So that is $900 plus the calf $200. So there is another $1300 I’m out.

Now this is why homesteaders should steer one-hundred percent clear from trying to raise beef for profit. If you can raise your own hay and graze the cow and get milk from it for your own personal use then you are ahead. A Dexter might make a nice between breed. Otherwise, find some idiot like myself, buy a half or a whole for $4 a pound and be glad you did not waste your time, and fencing, on a dull-witted animal that would be glad to run you over for a bucket of feed and kick you just because you happened to be standing there.

As for this idiot, I am passing on the knowledge of numbers and experience and I hope there is some wise person who will sit down and think it through before they try to spend their hard-earned money on a cow.

John Wayne  made a killing at .15 cents a pound in an era when a thousand dollars could have bought my whole seventy-six acre farm. Today, get out a shovel because cattle will put you in the hole and it is a long dig back out.

 

Water Heater Blues

It is winter again and everyone’s electric bills are hitting the roof. I might have stumbled upon an answer. The hot water tanks. It makes sense. The water temperature is just above freezing when it hits a greedy money sucking one-hundred-forty degree temperature demand. The little wheel on the electric heater goes berserk and our wallets get thinner and our tempers get hotter.

The fix seems to be a temper tank; a second tank of water which sits at room temperature and then is piped into the water heater. The idea is great but… where do you put the extra tank in a cramped, tiny, little house?  The tank must not leak. It must not sweat and create a mold condition. It must be open to the heat of a room to allow the water to raise in temp.

The closer to a heat source would be a grand idea. If you have a wood burner I would put the tank as close as I could get.

Where in tarnation do find one of the dagblasted things? The right size? It fits the space?

You can find safety expansion tanks, water heaters, even the inside guts to the tank, but, could someone come up with a dag nab twenty gallon, non-sweating temper tank I can just plumb-in? Good Grief Charlie Brown. I have been on this internet half an hour and I am so frustrated I finally had to sit down and write about it.

2kids left10

Do you know how much money I could be saving right now? Somehow I think the girls on the couch are thinking I am making a big deal out this. I could buy all their dog food for the extra money this issue is costing! It is a big deal. Stop looking at me like that…

May the electric companies shudder once I find a link to a temper tank and share it with all my friends.

Okay, that is it. I can not find a link to anything for this idea. You know, why not just take and put the cold water line into a big coil of copper pipe? Enough pipe might hold about twenty gallons of water and skip the whole tank idea. Heck, if I had a wood stove I could wrap the copper around the stove pipe and be dancing in the shower by the end of the night… and not even turn on the confounded money hungry water heater…so there Mr. Power Company…Ha!

Hmmmm… I see an addition to the house is needed. Time to pull out the saws, hammers and nails. One wood burning stove with a long black pipe wrapped in a copper spiral standing in a stonewall den coming right up- in about twenty years.

Done to Dogresied

Awe- look what all my ranting and raving has done to the dog. Guess I’ll have to pull out a dog bone to get her  untwisted. Those are in the same cupboard with the elderberry wine- yep- that should get me untwisted, too, in about fifteen minutes… well until next time.. bottoms up.

 

Farm Humor Pictured Here

Some of our fun farm moments. Enjoy.

dearlord10

Skeeter-Dot’s normal sleep mode…

Yah, not sure how the cat got named that, but she did.

 

DSCN4632farmhandpuppedout

Jeremy is taking a snooze. He is April’s pup.

 

goat flapMaster Sergeant Chicken says: Flap those wings goat! Faster!

 

junereadytorun

Moya is visiting our girls, Maya, Junzia, and April.

Don’t Look Back 2017

I was going to do a recap of the progress on the farm this year, but, the year was so awful I quit. I could hear the Country Blues band striking up their instruments and the song going like this:

We were flash flooded three times and the pond blew out…    da-du-da-dunt

Two cows died and the twister knocked our trees about…     da-du-da-dunt

My favorite computer crashed-the mother board is fried….  da-du-da-dunt

My best friend and neighbor- she just up and died…        da-du-da-dunt

A guy sold me a car he did not own…

Now I got to chew on him like some old bone…      da-du-da-dunt

We had to toss a renter to the curb…

’cause he liked expensive wacky herbs…    da-du-da-dunt

An idiot wrecked my car, the fools…

Yet another jerk,  stole my tools…   da-du-da-dunt

When you think it can  get no worse…

Taxes raise and  I got to handover a horse!    da-du-da-dunt

The cow prices are too low to sell…   da-du-da-dunt

My stallion was injured and struck the reaper’s bell…     da-du-da-dunt

The fox and coons wiped out the hens…  da-du-da-dunt

A coyote has the goats scared in their pens…   da-du-da-dunt

A hawk flew in and got the cat…

who would have even thought of that!    da-du-da-dunt

At least the hubby finally found a good job…

but the rest of this song makes me want to sob!    da-du-da-dunt

On the bright side mother  decided to stay…

and I found strength in God and learned to pray!     da-du-da-dunt

I think we’ll end this blues with a loud: “Hallelujah!”

Then a mumbled:    “Five more days and this year is over!”

We are “alive and kickin'” as my friend Mary would always say when I would call. I sure do miss the ole girl and I know she would have loved my song.  Sure hope 2018 starts off better.  Five more days. Five more days…

 

 

Great Dane Puppies- our first litter leaving the nest

The Puppies will soon be off to their new homes.
Gunner

Charlette50

I will be sad to see these wiggly balls of fur leave the farm. It is so hard to not get attached to them. Babies are the funnest part of daily life. It is the new life Spring brings which makes it my favorite season.

The pups have gained little personalities. They are tugging on each others ears and tails. Charlotte, the largest pup, plunges fearlessly into everything. Minnie, the smallest, holds her own with ferocious baby sister growls. Winston, the nearly solid blue male, sits and watches over the puppy pile. Samson, the blue mantel, is a happy go lucky fellow. PJ, the Merle mantle, is adorable in his spots and might have blue eyes. Gunner loves to sleep on his back with his paws up in the air. Daisy, with her spotted black nose, is the first to be up and knocking over her sister Heidi and her brother Jeremy. Gertie, with her sideways patch running down her nose, is not far behind chewing on whatever tail comes near.

PJ50

While they grow we are having the joy of watching them gain a quarter pound a day or more. It is amazing how quickly they transform from helpless grunting fuzz balls to wagging-tailed mini versions of mom in such a short five weeks!

PJMINNIE

 

It is so adorable to watch them sleep…

And eat…

And play…

 

PJ found a loving home in Pittsburgh with a nice couple.

 

HEIDI GUNNERGunner has found a family in VA who had just lost their Dane. They had him spoiled before he got in the car.GERTIE DAISY CHARLOTTEWINSTONJEREMY

Winston found a home with a local couple that just love him to pieces. They renamed him “Gunner.” He has two adopted siblings, a Yorkie and another Dane, to keep him company.

Samson is living locally with a family that are also friends. I will get to see him grow over the years which is a neat experience. They renamed him “Cochise.”

SAMSON

Puppies in the Kitchen

One Day Old
One Day Old
Growing Like Weeds
Growing Like Weeds- Ten Days Old

October 25, found us delivering our first puppies right in the Hubby’s lap. Nothing goes just how you plan it when you are homesteading- not even puppies.

The swimming pool was outside, waiting to be sanitized. April, our Dane girl, was not due; according to my friend who has bred a few of these big dogs, until November third. I had not yet driven to the Observer to get some old newspapers. The plan was to sweep and mop the kitchen floor, clear the counter of everything a Dane might nose, put the pool down, have it all lined with clean newspapers and be in complete readiness for the event… yah, well, here is how it really went.

As I was getting ready for work I heard a ruckus in the dog pen. April was emitting a low grow that was vibrating the dog house. The day prior, I blocked the big hole she had dug under the “doggie” deck. Her sister, Junezia, four inches taller, had decided to try the hole. That is right, she got stuck. After an anxious twenty minutes of shoveling; then pulling a hundred-fifteen pound Dane from her predicament- which was like pulling a stuck calf out of bawling cow- we were able to screw heavy boards to the deck. As an extra deterrent my daughter and I lined the deck with cement blocks. Thus, April could not birth her litter under the deck and for once I was a step ahead.

Listening to April growl at her sisters, it was decided to bring April inside where the hubby could watch her until we could get everything ready. These puppies were going to pay for every animals’ hay for the winter and the Dane girls dog food bill; so we were being cautious.
I came home from work at 4:30 to see a giant dog stretched in the lazy-boy- with slippers sticking out from under her. It took me a second to realize the hubby was under the dog. He was muttering, “She wouldn’t settle down until she got in my lap. She’s been groaning. I think she is in labor.”

I stepped over to check the tail end just as a puppy slid out. “No, honey, she’s giving birth,” I informed.

“What!” was his astonished reply. “You got to be kidding me?”

I lifted the wet, slimy, wiggling puppy; turning it upside down, “Nope…oh, my God, there is one on the floor still in it’s sack!”

At this point I went into emergency mode. The sack was cool and the fluid still in it. It was like trying to grab an egg off a tile floor one-handed. Remember I had the other hot mess in my left hand. Finally I had the sack and ran for the kitchen floor where I put the live pup down and ripped open the sack. Yah, it was a mess.

The hubby took the live puppy and gently shook it to help clear the lungs while April tried to drown it with her big tongue. The big boy was not moving and he was cool in my hands. April tried to lick him, too. Using a finger I opened his mouth and fluid came out. I rubbed, slapped, and pumped on the poor little guy, giving him quick jerky shakes. I heard a little growl, but, he was still not breathing. Gently I puffed a little air into his mouth. The hubby tossed me a dry towel and I rubbed the hide off him, I think. I gave him a couple of more puffs, and yes, he was wet and salty, but he was going to breathe. It was a tense five minutes. Finally the big blue pup took his own breaths.

Meanwhile, Don had thrown a towel on the floor for April to lay on. The second born pup was already happily robbing all the ninnies on her mom. The pup was going to need the head-start, as Minnie was the runt of the litter. At a full pound she was not a small runt, but, her brother was a half-pound bigger. After his near death experience; the little fella was slow to get started, once he did, however, Minnie had competition.

In a hurry I called my niece, telling her of my dilemma and asking her to get my daughter. Soon Mom and pups were in a clean pool with papers. Every hour a new pup arrived until 1AM. Exhausted, I left the situation to my daughter as I had to go to work at six. I just closed my eyes when I heard, “Mom!”

The last puppy arrived. A big white female harlequin who is now, two weeks later, a quarter pound heavier than her five brothers. All ten of the squiggly balls of fur are grunting, growling and trying to stand up. Yah, they will be ready for the outdoor pen in just a couple of days. In the meantime, there is a pile of puppies barely fitting in the swimming pool right in my kitchen. Their mom is eating us out of house and home, too. Wow, can nursing mom’s eat! Good thing I had thought ahead and cooked up real dog food. That store bought stuff just doesn’t cut it with a dog this big. Now, if I can just keep her out of the cat food!

PJ says "I can see!"
PJ says “I can see!”

Life is a bit busy right now. It always is when you’re trying to set your place up to homestead with the hope of going completely off-grid. Watching the babies grow is so worth it… Maybe I’ll find some time to set up at an indoor flea market and sell some of my self-published books and extra stuff cluttering up the place. Maybe take up a puppy to show off…

“Hey! Get out of that catfood!” Well, I’ll be right back…

It's my wagon! “It’s my wagon!”

Meanwhile Maya and Junezia are outside fighting over a car ride. Kids!

Killer Potato?

Luke Frywalker

While surfing the net for a completely different topic, I came across the sad story an eight-year old Russian girl who became an orphan when rotting potatoes in the root cellar killed the whole family. I can recall my grandmother sorting out green-tinted potatoes and potatoes with long eyes. She threw them to the pigs or planted them. More than once I have smelled a rotting potato under the sink and had the unpleasant task of cleaning the mess.
So how can a potato kill you without the french-fry grease, sour cream or twice-baked bacon crumble?
According to the Michigan State University Extension rotting potatoes give off solanine gas. A green potato indicates the toxin is present. The reason why Gran-pap always planted the potatoes deep was because the light reacts with my favorite starch producing vegetable- creating higher levels of solanine.
In a confined space solanine gas can cause a person to fall unconscious and stop breathing which is what happened to the child’s family. There have been more reports over the centuries of such a thing happening.
Not only can potatoes be a problem but other veggies from the nightshade family such as tomatoes and eggplant. The addition of light to a potato, however, is how solanine becomes toxic. It is best to store ‘taters in a cool, dark place where you can ventilate the area should some go bad. Do not forget them under the sink, in other words.
Remember:

If the potato has long eyes,

If it is turning “Hulk” green,

It might be best to say good-bye

To the french fry-

before it turns solanine mean.

Okay, so I mashed that poem-Take it with a grain of salt, a pat of butter and some freshly cracked pepper. LoL

Our First Kid 2017

ladies in waiting

We have been waiting for a month for our first babies to drop. Finally, we got a girl from Roxanne. She was so huge I expected twins. Hours later no new developments. The baby girl was up and bouncing within twenty minutes. The energy of these tiny new life forms is amazing! Bounce! Bounce! Bounce!

Pumpkin Pumpkin arrived 6-20

Finally, Pumpkin settled down for a nap and I finally could get some baby pictures! She is going to be a uniquely colored goat I think. A few times she came over to see if my leg would give milk and followed me around. The best time to bond with a baby is right at birth. Hopefully this little girl will be a pocket goat like her mother.

We brought Mom and baby into the lean-to where I can control the flies. I was hoping for May babies when the flies are not so daunting. I sprayed the walls down while the baby tried to find breakfast. I wish there was a way to kill every fly on the farm. It is always an endless battle of fly sprays and traps. The flies can actually lay eggs on my new baby and then potentially cause problems. Getting her clean was a top priority. Towels!

With the babies coming, it is time for the buck, Boomer, to be moved from the herd and begin his summer work as a weed eater. If I leave him in there his scent will get into the milk and the cheese. That is a strong taste. Oh, milk, lots of milking ahead and lots of time consumed making cheese. Forgot about that part after being out of milk for six months. My schedule just filled up along with the freezer!

It is early morning and time to go check the herd. We will be putting up another charger to electrify the fence and hopefully keep the coyotes out, or the bobcat or the fox.  I am not sure what carried off all my chickens, but, I have not caught it yet and the dogs were barking last night. Kind of worrisome to a Farmer Mom.

Farmstead Distractions

Antique Rose

So never be anxious about the next day, for the next day will have its own anxieties. Each day has enough of its own troubles. Matthew 6:34

The morning started with picture taking. A nice quiet morning. I planned on an all day attack on the rental unit repairs. To keep the distractions to a minimum I called my neighbor to see if she needed any help getting from her bed to her wheelchair today. She had help on the way. Then I drove up to my adopted niece’s place to find she was in need of a screw for her lawn mower handle which she was struggling with. Returning with screw, distraction averted, I headed for the unit.

lastbedroom The last bedroom coming along.

bathrThe bathroom getting walled in.

While my brother picked up building debris I slapped up the first piece of drywall in the bathroom and started cutting the hole for the vanity mirror. We put a false wall in to accommodate the plumbing. Adding real 2×4 next to the 1/2″ wall boards made it so we could put drywall up and now the walls do not move around. How these old trailers did not collapse en-route to their destinations I am amazed!

About the time I really get started to beat the heat of the soon-to-be ninety degree/sixty percent humidity day, my daughter comes in carrying this little surprise explaining it has to be Silver’s. Silver’s babies are already over a week old. Distraction Number One.

babt surprise Buck bunny gives birth?

Going to the barn my daughter and youngest brother in their limited manner, explain where they found the rabbit and that Silver Lady is running loose. A quick examination of the “buck” pen explains everything. Well, the rabbit I was planning on having for Sunday dinner just extended “his” life. I have been growing this extra male bunny big enough for a rarely enjoyed delicacy. Unfortunately the real buck killed the other four babies, but, my daughter’s pet python was not fussy. Waste not want not on this farm.

We raise all our live babies and sell them. After trying to figure out where to put the buck rabbit, we thought we fixed the cage to now harbor the new unexpected arrival. Hopefully the little feller makes it.

Back to the rental unit and making holes in the dry wall, so I thought. I was stopped by the hubby who he told me my brother had locked the place. Hmm. Great. The key hunt was on.

Unlocked and ready for work I just marked out the hole when the hubby asked for a hand to fix the stater on the four-wheeler. I have not been able to use it for almost two years. I was threatening to take it to the dealer and pay four-hundred dollars for the labor, so, the hubby set aside his distractions to get it fixed. Off to the garage we went, and the days heat was already messing with my asthma.

While the hubby searched for tools I happened to look up and see something strange against the ceiling and the cement wall. Yet, another distraction procured this four-foot-three-inch skin from the top of the shelving unit. Two more of three-foot length skins were curled up along a gap in the ceiling. Great, now we have snakes in the garage. Fantastic!

snakeskin4-3in Four-foot skin!

This is how come I never get to finish a project. Sitting back at the house trying to cool off; my daughter again appears with the baby. She and my younger brother were trying to find a board to replace the emergency cardboard I had slapped in the cage bottom. She explained the baby had fallen through the grid and gotten stuck. I examined it, curled it up in my hand. It tried to nurse on my palm.

This poor little critter. Already it had fallen out of the cage and crawled five feet. We think Silver Lady had heard its cries and literally yanked her feeder out of the way, pushed herself through the opening, to set on the baby, which is why I think it survived. My brother, coming in to feed the bunnies disturbed her and he nearly stepped on the baby, which is why they thought it was Silvers. If the poor thing makes it we are naming it Miracle.

While the hubby now took a hand in fixing the pen for our new arrival, I sat and watched westerns; keeping it warm against my own body. At this point nurse Lass heard the baby. She was ready to

15lassbabysitter15 Nurse Lass is on duty with all babies.

lick her new charge. She really wanted the baby! Whining and staring at me like she does when I have a steak on the plate. She even did some worrisome “woofs”; like I had a puppy that might be hers!

Just a few weeks ago, a newborn bunny baby had unfortunately found its way out of the nest and through a gap in the wire flooring we had missed. I brought the baby in the house hoping to warm it, but, it was already too late. While I went out to fix the pen, Lass took the baby out of the towel on the counter and curled up with it, trying to bring it back with her own body heat. This is just an amazing example of the Labrador’s strong maternal instinct!

Determined to get the drywall cut I again made for the rental unit, but stopped when I saw my daughter coming back from the barn. Again- the newborn baby was back. It had fallen out of the nest! Going to the barn I saw where the side boards were pushed out just enough to cause the problem. Putting Miracle back in with Momma bunny, Sunday- the big rabbit’s new name, I stayed put while my daughter ran to find a board, screws and a drill. After averting yet another near death experience I decided to check in on last weeks arrivals. Silver Lady weighs in over twenty-pounds. Her babies are sweet and gentle- and cute!

silver  babybunnysilvers  babybunnysilversallwhite

Out of pure spite toward whatever whimsical power that constantly distracts my time, I went down to the rental and I put a hole in the drywall for the window and the vanity. It was hot and humid, but, by George, that wall was up!

Now, to bag up the 12 quarts of dog food veggies I boiled and  eat my dinner. Guess it is Ramen noodles tonight and venison tips for Sunday’s dinner. Not exactly what I had planned, but, that’s farmsteading…

Discovered “Where Writer’s Win”

Treasure Chest

“Treasure is hard work built up over time.”

I just discovered an informative website named, Where Writers Win. I am listening to the webinar, How to Build Your Author Platform with Online Marketing and Social Media. To check it out click here for a link.

The video is a consolidation of a lot of stuff I have read before. If you can not guess, my time is very limited. I was up at 5AM this morning because I could not sleep after having a stressful day involving my adopted niece and a new lawyer to restart a custody battle for her son.

My adopted nephew is eight years old and a very sensitive child who does not handle stress well. The new lawyer was so moved by this five-year long battle and the sight of my nephew curled in an unresponsive ball, she actually cut her retainer fee in half so we could get the battle started. The father has access to people with a lot of money and it is a long sad story which has been shredding my niece’s sanity one fiber at a time.

Anyways, I decided to rekindle my search for a way to kick-start the sales of my books and help fund some of the battle  about to get underway. This video has a lot of advice; which over the years I have been slowly putting to use, as time allows. If you have visited my website you can see it did not happen overnight.

I try to update something on my website at least once a month to encourage the “web-crawlers” to find me. Yes, that does sound creepy, “web-crawlers.”

Besides my books, I write articles which hold interest to me, such as poison ivy cures, for example, or identifying the spider crawling up my arm for another. Got to love farming.

I also have this blog, which I try to add something to once a week for the same reason. Be sure to add links to your website pages and other media.

I do not own a cell phone- you heard right- I do not own a cell phone because it is expensive and I would drive myself nuts trying to find it under the tractor tires, mounds of hay, in cow stomachs or swimming in the ponds. How many of those technological gadgets I would destroy would dwindle my wallet a few hundred bucks a month. Money better spent trying to build a business and help my niece- then I might be able to afford to lock one up in a desk and never let it leave the office.

Twitter, because I do not have a cell phone is not a platform I can follow easily. Pinterest I do like. It is fun.  I pin stuff from my website to my categories which helps people find me. You can find just about anything on it, including healing herbs and recipes.

Linked-in I found too professional for my laid back country bumpkin style. Facebook I enjoy. I just learned how to link this blog over to it. Being a shy person, it is hard for me to “toot my own horn” in front of my family and friends. I guess I do not want them to think I am showing off or something; you know what I mean? However, you get immediate feedback, which is nice.

Good Reads. Now there is something I am going to check out. Be right back. Well, signed up. It is a place where you can put your favorite books on a virtual shelf and your friends can see which books are your favorites. You can even rate the books. If you have favorite quotes you can find them and have them stashed in one place. That is neat.

 

“Treasure is hard work built up over time.”  Just made that one up on the fly. I’m sure someone has said this somewhere before. Well apparently not on the internet because I just looked, so guess it’s mine! LOL